skip to Main Content

July 4, 2019

Please read today’s Scriptures and use the comment section on this page to share your insights from today’s reading. You can also just mention a verse that impacted you or post a question!

Read (and Hear) the Bible in One Year
Christian Standard Bible for 2019

Text: Psalm 106-107
Audio: Psalm 106-107

You can use the audio Bible as a guide to help “set the pace” as you read along.

2 Kings 5 (ESV)

Naaman, commander of the army of the king of Syria, was a great man with his master and in high favor, because by him the Lord had given victory to Syria. He was a mighty man of valor, but he was a leper. Now the Syrians on one of their raids had carried off a little girl from the land of Israel, and she worked in the service of Naaman’s wife. She said to her mistress, “Would that my lord were with the prophet who is in Samaria! He would cure him of his leprosy.” So Naaman went in and told his lord, “Thus and so spoke the girl from the land of Israel.” And the king of Syria said, “Go now, and I will send a letter to the king of Israel.”

So he went, taking with him ten talents of silver, six thousand shekels of gold, and ten changes of clothing. And he brought the letter to the king of Israel, which read, “When this letter reaches you, know that I have sent to you Naaman my servant, that you may cure him of his leprosy.” And when the king of Israel read the letter, he tore his clothes and said, “Am I God, to kill and to make alive, that this man sends word to me to cure a man of his leprosy? Only consider, and see how he is seeking a quarrel with me.”

But when Elisha the man of God heard that the king of Israel had torn his clothes, he sent to the king, saying, “Why have you torn your clothes? Let him come now to me, that he may know that there is a prophet in Israel.” So Naaman came with his horses and chariots and stood at the door of Elisha’s house. 10 And Elisha sent a messenger to him, saying, “Go and wash in the Jordan seven times, and your flesh shall be restored, and you shall be clean.” 11 But Naaman was angry and went away, saying, “Behold, I thought that he would surely come out to me and stand and call upon the name of the Lord his God, and wave his hand over the place and cure the leper. 12 Are not Abana and Pharpar, the rivers of Damascus, better than all the waters of Israel? Could I not wash in them and be clean?” So he turned and went away in a rage. 13 But his servants came near and said to him, “My father, it is a great word the prophet has spoken to you; will you not do it? Has he actually said to you, ‘Wash, and be clean’?” 14 So he went down and dipped himself seven times in the Jordan, according to the word of the man of God, and his flesh was restored like the flesh of a little child, and he was clean.

15 Then he returned to the man of God, he and all his company, and he came and stood before him. And he said, “Behold, I know that there is no God in all the earth but in Israel; so accept now a present from your servant.” 16 But he said, “As the Lord lives, before whom I stand, I will receive none.” And he urged him to take it, but he refused. 17 Then Naaman said, “If not, please let there be given to your servant two mule loads of earth, for from now on your servant will not offer burnt offering or sacrifice to any god but the Lord. 18 In this matter may the Lord pardon your servant: when my master goes into the house of Rimmon to worship there, leaning on my arm, and I bow myself in the house of Rimmon, when I bow myself in the house of Rimmon, the Lord pardon your servant in this matter.” 19 He said to him, “Go in peace.”

But when Naaman had gone from him a short distance, 20 Gehazi, the servant of Elisha the man of God, said, “See, my master has spared this Naaman the Syrian, in not accepting from his hand what he brought. As the Lord lives, I will run after him and get something from him.” 21 So Gehazi followed Naaman. And when Naaman saw someone running after him, he got down from the chariot to meet him and said, “Is all well?” 22 And he said, “All is well. My master has sent me to say, ‘There have just now come to me from the hill country of Ephraim two young men of the sons of the prophets. Please give them a talent of silver and two changes of clothing.’” 23 And Naaman said, “Be pleased to accept two talents.” And he urged him and tied up two talents of silver in two bags, with two changes of clothing, and laid them on two of his servants. And they carried them before Gehazi. 24 And when he came to the hill, he took them from their hand and put them in the house, and he sent the men away, and they departed. 25 He went in and stood before his master, and Elisha said to him, “Where have you been, Gehazi?” And he said, “Your servant went nowhere.” 26 But he said to him, “Did not my heart go when the man turned from his chariot to meet you? Was it a time to accept money and garments, olive orchards and vineyards, sheep and oxen, male servants and female servants? 27 Therefore the leprosy of Naaman shall cling to you and to your descendants forever.” So he went out from his presence a leper, like snow.

How do I login and comment?

Click here to enter your login information. Once you are logged in, you will be able to comment on this chapter by writing in the “comment box” below (under the social media icons).

NOTE: If you see a place to enter your username and password under the social media icons below, you are not logged in yet. You can either enter your login information there or use the “Click here” link above to login and comment.

Happy Commenting! 🙂

Next: 2 Kings 6

Back: 2 Kings 4

This Post Has 2 Comments
  1. The Purpose of Miracles

    Just as the previous chapter showed miracles that Elisha did that were similar to our Lord's miracles, today Elisha heals Naaman of leprosy (as Jesus did) – but not by touching him and bringing healing but telling him to "wash in the Jordan seven times, and your flesh shall be restored, and you shall be clean" (2 Kings 5:10). 

    This reminds me of the events recorded in John 4:46-53, "At Capernaum there was an official whose son was ill. When this man heard that Jesus had come from Judea to Galilee, he went to him and asked him to come down and heal his son, for he was at the point of death. 48 So Jesus said to him, “Unless you see signs and wonders you will not believe.” 49 The official said to him, “Sir, come down before my child dies.” 50 Jesus said to him, “Go; your son will live.” The man believed the word that Jesus spoke to him and went on his way. 51 As he was going down, his servants met him and told him that his son was recovering. 52 So he asked them the hour when he began to get better, and they said to him, “Yesterday at the seventh hour the fever left him.” 53 The father knew that was the hour when Jesus had said to him, “Your son will live.” And he himself believed, and all his household."

    Although Naaman's initial response was anger, (he even turned and went away in a rage), when he was finally washed in the Jordan seven times and was healed, he said, "Behold, I know that there is no God in all the earth but in Israel; so accept now a present from your servant" (2 Kings 5:15). 

    Miracles were (are) never intended as an end to themselves. When God does a miracle today, no matter how miraculous, it is intended to ultimately bring Him glory. Yes, it can also be to deepen our faith and build our trust in God. But God does miraculous things among other things, to affirm He is the Lord God Almighty and ultimately, it is to bring glory to Himself. 

    Most people find it easy to glorify God when miracles happen (even if they don't really know what glorifying God means). 

    But when things do not go our way; when prayers are not answered the way we want them to be; when miracles seem to pass us by, we should glorify God in those circumstances as well. After all, if we only bring God glory when He does things we want Him to do, what does that say about us? 

    Is our love for God conditional?

    Do you find it hard to glorify God when things don't go our way?
     

  2. I've been teaching myself to "praise Him in the storm." 

    It used to be that when I had a bad day and things didn't go the way I wanted them to, I would become frustrated and angry, and my mood would reflect my emotions. 

    Now, I even have a sense of humor about it, and I'll laugh and make jokes about mishaps. I know it's the devil trying to mess with me, and I also see these times as a test from God. 

    Am I going to put into practice what I've learned about having patience, and not being quick to anger, or will I let my emotions rule me? 

    It's a difficult thing for me, probably one of the toughest character flaws that I need to overcome, but I know that if I continue to put Jesus' teachings into practice, I will continue to grow as a Christian. I put my faith in Him. 

Leave a Reply

×Close search
Search