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August 25, 2019

Please read today’s Scriptures and use the comment section on this page to share your insights from today’s reading. You can also just mention a verse that impacted you or post a question!

Read (and Hear) the Bible in One Year
Christian Standard Bible for 2019

Text: Jeremiah 46-48
Audio: Jeremiah 46-48

You can use the audio Bible as a guide to help “set the pace” as you read along.

2 Chronicles 3 (ESV)

Then Solomon began to build the house of the Lord in Jerusalem on Mount Moriah, where the Lord had appeared to David his father, at the place that David had appointed, on the threshing floor of Ornan the Jebusite. He began to build in the second month of the fourth year of his reign. These are Solomon’s measurements for building the house of God: the length, in cubits of the old standard, was sixty cubits, and the breadth twenty cubits. The vestibule in front of the nave of the house was twenty cubits long, equal to the width of the house, and its height was 120 cubits. He overlaid it on the inside with pure gold. The nave he lined with cypress and covered it with fine gold and made palms and chains on it. He adorned the house with settings of precious stones. The gold was gold of Parvaim. So he lined the house with gold—its beams, its thresholds, its walls, and its doors—and he carved cherubim on the walls.

And he made the Most Holy Place. Its length, corresponding to the breadth of the house, was twenty cubits, and its breadth was twenty cubits. He overlaid it with 600 talents of fine gold. The weight of gold for the nails was fifty shekels.And he overlaid the upper chambers with gold.

10 In the Most Holy Place he made two cherubim of wood and overlaid them with gold. 11 The wings of the cherubim together extended twenty cubits: one wing of the one, of five cubits, touched the wall of the house, and its other wing, of five cubits, touched the wing of the other cherub; 12 and of this cherub, one wing, of five cubits, touched the wall of the house, and the other wing, also of five cubits, was joined to the wing of the first cherub. 13 The wings of these cherubim extended twenty cubits. The cherubim stood on their feet, facing the nave. 14 And he made the veil of blue and purple and crimson fabrics and fine linen, and he worked cherubim on it.

15 In front of the house he made two pillars thirty-five cubits high, with a capital of five cubits on the top of each. 16 He made chains like a necklace and put them on the tops of the pillars, and he made a hundred pomegranates and put them on the chains. 17 He set up the pillars in front of the temple, one on the south, the other on the north; that on the south he called Jachin, and that on the north Boaz.

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Next: 2 Chronicles 4

Back: 2 Chronicles 2

This Post Has 2 Comments
  1. Building The Temple

    As 1 Chronicles was concluding we were reminded that although David was not going to build the temple, he made sure Solomon had everything he needed to begin construction including the "plan of the vestibule of the temple, and of its houses, its treasuries, its upper rooms, and its inner chambers, and of the room for the mercy seat; 12 and the plan of all that he had in mind for the courts of the house of the Lord, all the surrounding chambers, the treasuries of the house of God, and the treasuries for dedicated gifts" (1 Chronicles 28:11-12). 

    As far back as 1 Chronicles 22, David had the location of the temple as well as "nails for the doors of the gates and for clamps, as well as bronze in quantities beyond weighing, 4 and cedar timbers without number (2 Chronicles 22:3-4).

    In today's reading we learn that Solomon waited to start building the temple until the "second month of the fourth year of his reign." 

    To Solomon's credit, he waited to build his "royal palace" until the temple was built. But what took so long to start building it? 

    1 Kings 5:13-18 says, "King Solomon drafted forced labor out of all Israel, and the draft numbered 30,000 men. 14 And he sent them to Lebanon, 10,000 a month in shifts. They would be a month in Lebanon and two months at home. Adoniram was in charge of the draft. 15 Solomon also had 70,000 burden-bearers and 80,000 stonecutters in the hill country, 16 besides Solomon's 3,300 chief officers who were over the work, who had charge of the people who carried on the work. 17 At the king's command they quarried out great, costly stones in order to lay the foundation of the house with dressed stones. 18 So Solomon's builders and Hiram's builders and the men of Gebal did the cutting and prepared the timber and the stone to build the house."

    So God filled the temple when it was completed (1 Kings 8:10-11) and He consecrated it (1 Kings 9:3) but it was built by slaves? Who were these people forced into labor?

    1 Kings 9:19-20 says, "all the store cities that Solomon had, and the cities for his chariots, and the cities for his horsemen, and whatever Solomon desired to build in Jerusalem, in Lebanon, and in all the land of his dominion. 20 All the people who were left of the Amorites, the Hittites, the Perizzites, the Hivites, and the Jebusites, who were not of the people of Israel."

    Solomon's temple was built by the captives from nations that Israel had previously fought against. 

    Why did God permit slavery?

    John Piper offers some valuable insight into this question and points out why there are Old Testament laws and principles that do not have validity today in the life of believers or the church:

    https://www.desiringgod.org/interviews/why-did-god-permit-slavery
     

  2. That article was very interesting! I like how John Piper writes – easy to understand and very educational. 

    Many times I've wondered why God allowed certain things in the Old Testament, and slavery was at the top of my list. I couldn't understand abuse being okay with God, but now I see that God's instructions were different than people's execution. 

    I also love how he explains the God used people as an instrument to carry out His will.  

    My favorite part, though, is that with abuse eliminated and love added in, slavery became employment. 

    It's fascinating to read people like Sproul, MacArthur, and Piper – I learn so much, and always have a greater understanding of things after I've read them. So cool.  

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