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July 25, 2019

Please read today’s Scriptures and use the comment section on this page to share your insights from today’s reading. You can also just mention a verse that impacted you or post a question!

Read (and Hear) the Bible in One Year
Christian Standard Bible for 2019

Text: Ecclesiastes 5-8
Audio: Ecclesiastes 5-8

You can use the audio Bible as a guide to help “set the pace” as you read along.

1 Chronicles 1 (ESV)

Adam, Seth, Enosh; Kenan, Mahalalel, Jared; Enoch, Methuselah, Lamech;Noah, Shem, Ham, and Japheth.

The sons of Japheth: Gomer, Magog, Madai, Javan, Tubal, Meshech, and Tiras.The sons of Gomer: Ashkenaz, Riphath, and Togarmah. The sons of Javan: Elishah, Tarshish, Kittim, and Rodanim.

The sons of Ham: Cush, Egypt, Put, and Canaan. The sons of Cush: Seba, Havilah, Sabta, Raamah, and Sabteca. The sons of Raamah: Sheba and Dedan.10 Cush fathered Nimrod. He was the first on earth to be a mighty man.

11 Egypt fathered Ludim, Anamim, Lehabim, Naphtuhim, 12 Pathrusim, Casluhim (from whom the Philistines came), and Caphtorim.

13 Canaan fathered Sidon his firstborn and Heth, 14 and the Jebusites, the Amorites, the Girgashites, 15 the Hivites, the Arkites, the Sinites, 16 the Arvadites, the Zemarites, and the Hamathites.

17 The sons of Shem: Elam, Asshur, Arpachshad, Lud, and Aram. And the sons of Aram: Uz, Hul, Gether, and Meshech. 18 Arpachshad fathered Shelah, and Shelah fathered Eber. 19 To Eber were born two sons: the name of the one was Peleg (for in his days the earth was divided), and his brother’s name was Joktan. 20 Joktan fathered Almodad, Sheleph, Hazarmaveth, Jerah, 21 Hadoram, Uzal, Diklah,22 Obal, Abimael, Sheba, 23 Ophir, Havilah, and Jobab; all these were the sons of Joktan.

24 Shem, Arpachshad, Shelah; 25 Eber, Peleg, Reu; 26 Serug, Nahor, Terah;27 Abram, that is, Abraham.

28 The sons of Abraham: Isaac and Ishmael. 29 These are their genealogies: the firstborn of Ishmael, Nebaioth, and Kedar, Adbeel, Mibsam, 30 Mishma, Dumah, Massa, Hadad, Tema, 31 Jetur, Naphish, and Kedemah. These are the sons of Ishmael. 32 The sons of Keturah, Abraham’s concubine: she bore Zimran, Jokshan, Medan, Midian, Ishbak, and Shuah. The sons of Jokshan: Sheba and Dedan.33 The sons of Midian: Ephah, Epher, Hanoch, Abida, and Eldaah. All these were the descendants of Keturah.

34 Abraham fathered Isaac. The sons of Isaac: Esau and Israel. 35 The sons of Esau: Eliphaz, Reuel, Jeush, Jalam, and Korah. 36 The sons of Eliphaz: Teman, Omar, Zepho, Gatam, Kenaz, and of Timna, Amalek. 37 The sons of Reuel: Nahath, Zerah, Shammah, and Mizzah.

38 The sons of Seir: Lotan, Shobal, Zibeon, Anah, Dishon, Ezer, and Dishan. 39 The sons of Lotan: Hori and Hemam; and Lotan’s sister was Timna. 40 The sons of Shobal: Alvan, Manahath, Ebal, Shepho, and Onam. The sons of Zibeon: Aiah and Anah. 41 The son of Anah: Dishon. The sons of Dishon: Hemdan, Eshban, Ithran, and Cheran. 42 The sons of Ezer: Bilhan, Zaavan, and Akan. The sons of Dishan: Uz and Aran.

43 These are the kings who reigned in the land of Edom before any king reigned over the people of Israel: Bela the son of Beor, the name of his city being Dinhabah. 44 Bela died, and Jobab the son of Zerah of Bozrah reigned in his place.45 Jobab died, and Husham of the land of the Temanites reigned in his place.46 Husham died, and Hadad the son of Bedad, who defeated Midian in the country of Moab, reigned in his place, the name of his city being Avith. 47 Hadad died, and Samlah of Masrekah reigned in his place. 48 Samlah died, and Shaul of Rehoboth on the Euphrates reigned in his place. 49 Shaul died, and Baal-hanan, the son of Achbor, reigned in his place. 50 Baal-hanan died, and Hadad reigned in his place, the name of his city being Pai; and his wife’s name was Mehetabel, the daughter of Matred, the daughter of Mezahab. 51 And Hadad died.

The chiefs of Edom were: chiefs Timna, Alvah, Jetheth, 52 Oholibamah, Elah, Pinon, 53 Kenaz, Teman, Mibzar, 54 Magdiel, and Iram; these are the chiefs of Edom.

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Next: 1 Chronicles 2

Back: 2 Kings 25

This Post Has One Comment
  1. Back to the Beginning

    As I read this first chapter of 1 Chronicles, I did so while listening to an audio Bible to help me not get "bogged down" as I tried to pronounce the names of each person listed. I will do this through the first nine chapters of 1 Chronicles as each chapter covers a different genealogy. 

    If you struggle reading through genealogies, you're not alone. However, we must think beyond ourselves and look at why the author would go back in time – all the way to Adam. 

    In the last chapter of 2 Kings, Nebuchadnezzar invaded Judah, destroyed Jerusalem and took the Jews captive in Babylon. What might be the significance of the genealogies in 1 Chronicles?

    Nelson's Old Testament Survey, it says:

    "If Chronicles was addressed to the earliest of the returned Jews, it must have been composed to meet the most profound needs of that community. Surely the uppermost question was whether the Lord could and would restore the house of David to its former glory and grandeur. Were the ancient promises to the ancestors now null and void in light of Israel’s sin, or might it yet be possible that they were still in effect? The constant attention in Chronicles to the Davidic Covenant and its eternal nature was intended without doubt to build confidence that what God had begun He would complete, in spite of the sins of His people."

    Dyer, C., Merrill, E., Swindoll, C. R., & Zuck, R. B. (2001). Nelson’s Old Testament Survey: Discover the Background, Theology and Meaning of Every Book in the Old Testament (p. 295). Nashville, TN: Word.

    In his Study Bible, John MacArthur writes:

    "The chronicler’s selective genealogy and history of Israel, stretching from Adam (1 Chr. 1:1) to the return from Babylon (2 Chr 26:23), was intended to remind the Jews of God’s promises and intentions about: 1) the Land; 2) the nation; 3) the Davidic king; 4) the Levitical priests; 5) the temple; and 6) true worship, none of which had been abrogated because of the Babylonian captivity. All of this was to remind them of their spiritual heritage during the difficult times they faced, and to encourage them to be faithful to God."

    MacArthur, J., Jr. (Ed.). (1997). The MacArthur Study Bible (electronic ed., p. 563). Nashville, TN: Word Pub.

    Nelson's Old Testament Survey also outlines the theological emphases of 1 and 2 Chronicles:

    "The most important theological ideas in Chronicles are (a) the centrality of the Davidic dynasty, founded on the unconditional covenant God made with him; (b) the role of David and his royal successors in establishing the temple and its services; and (c) the very evident purpose of selecting Israel under David’s rule as the vehicle by which God would extend His saving grace to the whole world. These emphases pervade both 1 and 2 Chronicles extensively."

    Dyer, C., Merrill, E., Swindoll, C. R., & Zuck, R. B. (2001). Nelson’s Old Testament Survey: Discover the Background, Theology and Meaning of Every Book in the Old Testament (pp. 295–296). Nashville, TN: Word.

    Not everything in Scripture is intended for us to apply to our lives, but that doesn't make it any less important. We may not know the significance of everything we read or understand its value to our lives, but knowing the history of our faith is clearly important to God!

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